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My Favorite Remoulade Sauce Recipe

I must say, it’s good to be back in the saddle again after two weeks of vacation in Europe. While I’d love to tell you all about that right now, we have more pressing matters at hand. For instance, in two day is one of the tastiest holidays in South Louisiana – Good Friday. Confused? Let me explain.

Good Friday is the Friday right before Easter. This the day that Jesus was crucified back in Biblical times. It’s a highly significant Christian holiday, but is one that’s “celebrated” quite differently in South Louisiana than it is anywhere else. You might remember in my St. Joseph’s Day post how I talked about how non-religious people here celebrate the holidays along with the religious folks. Perhaps for different reasons, but we still observe the holidays, nonetheless. Good Friday is up there along with Christmas, Easter and St. Patrick’s Day in terms of secular celebration of a holiday that has deeply religious origins.

My Favorite Remoulade Sauce Recipe

Here in South Louisiana, unlike most places, many people are even given an extra day off of work. It’s that big of a deal around here. Most people here celebrate with large gatherings of family and friends enjoying things like boiled crawfish, crabs and shrimp. To say it’s the biggest seafood day of the year in South Louisiana is an under-statement. In fact, the price of crawfish typically drops significantly after the holiday has passed. Jeremy and I usually celebrate by going down to Golden Meadow, my hometown, and having a huge crawfish boil with my sister and her family along with some other random relatives, depending on who’s around. It’s a great day to relax and spend time with the ones we love.

My Favorite Remoulade Sauce Recipe

To be honest, not being a religious person at all, it’s been a little difficult in a way for me to write about these topics. Before now I’ve not really thought about them much in context of religious versus secular. I’ve celebrated them all my life while not really thinking about why. It’s just a part of the culture in Louisiana, and how we do things here. It does harken back to the original Cajuns who were Catholic by faith but fairly secular in practice. It’s an interesting concept that I’ve uncovered in the course of writing our Southeast Louisiana food culture book. For all you religious folks out there, I hope that my respect comes across as intended in these posts. My goal is only to help educate people about how interesting the culture here is in South Louisiana.

My Favorite Remoulade Sauce Recipe

So anyway, let’s get back to the goods at hand – Good Friday foods. In my family, that mainly means boiled crawfish with all of the fixings – an array of veggies (potatoes, corn, sausage, onions, garlic, traditionally; Brussels sprouts, mushrooms and asparagus, more recently), crackers, and a big bowl of dip. “Dip” is something that we use in the more Southern parts of the state with our crawfish. While the good people of New Orleans and its immediate surrounding areas typically eat crawfish without any dipping sauce, where I’m from, it’s nearly a sin to serve boiled crawfish (or crabs or shrimp) without it!

My Favorite Remoulade Sauce Recipe

The most basic version of dip is a combination of mayonnaise, yellow mustard and ketchup. However, there are endless numbers of variations and differences. Some people add boiled egg, green onions or minced garlic. Others like to use fancier mustards like Creole or Dijon. For me personally, I like to take it to the next level and use something akin to a classic Remoulade sauce, hence the recipe you see here today.

However, I’ve even taken Remoulade and turned it on its head. Many people have, in fact. It’s one of those universal sauces that has about 100,000 versions and variations. I think the biggest differences between mine and many others is that I don’t use mayonnaise or ketchup in mine. Instead I use sour cream as the base and use Sriracha hot sauce to get the pinkish tint that’s fairly well associated with most (but not all) Remoulade sauces.

My Favorite Remoulade Sauce Recipe

While Remoulade sauce is a classic and well-known accompaniment to seafood, it’s also great for more common, everyday uses like salad dressing, dip or sandwich spread. It’s quite versatile and pairs nicely with nearly any vegetable and most cold cuts. I love to use it as a dip for roasted sweet potato chunks or as a delicious dressing for a simple cucumber, tomato and spring mix salad. Perhaps my favorite use is as a spread on a Fried Green Tomato Po’Boy. Yes that’s a real thing and yes, I will be bringing you a recipe as soon as my farmer’s market has green summer tomatoes. The possibilities for use with Remoulade are nearly endless. You may find yourself wanting to have some of this on hand at all times. That would be perfectly fine!

So while most of you are at work on Friday, like it’s any old regular Friday, take comfort in the fact that most people living in South Louisiana are stuffing their faces with some combination of boiled crawfish, crabs, and shrimp. Don’t worry, we’ll enjoy your share for you! 😉 I’m really excited because this will only be my second crawfish of the season, which started all the way back in late December/early January. I’m totally late this year, but I can live with that. I’m sure it’ll be more readily and cheaply available after this weekend anyway.

My Favorite Remoulade Sauce Recipe

I hope you all have a great Easter weekend, however you celebrate with your friends and family. Speaking of which – what are some interesting and creative ways that the Easter weekend is celebrated where you’re from? Is Good Friday a big deal? Is it more about the Easter meal itself? Let me know in the comments below – I’m interested to hear what your traditions are all about.

Yield: 2 1/4 cups

My Favorite Remoulade Sauce Recipe

This Remoulade sauce recipe is my version of the venerable French classic sauce/dressing. Pairs well with seafood as well as veggies and most meats.

Ingredients:

  • 1-16 ounce container of sour cream
  • 1/2 cup chopped green onion tops and bottoms
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon Creole mustard
  • 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 teaspoons Sriracha hot sauce
  • 1 teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon celery salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper

Method:

  1. Add all ingredients to a bowl and mix well to combine. Refrigerate for two hours to allow flavors to marry.
  2. Use as a dip for boiled crawfish, crabs or shrimp. This recipe can also be used as a sandwich spread or a dip for crudités.

Prep:10 min

Total:2 hour 10 min

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